Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 2nd International Conference and Expo on Clinical Psychology
Holiday Inn Amsterdam – Arena Towers. Hoogoord .

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Susanna Mittermaier

Founder of Pragmatic Psychology, Austria

Keynote: Pragmatic Psychology- How do we make psychology more realistic to people

Time : 9:00 A.M to 9:40 A.M

Conference Series CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY 2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Susanna Mittermaier photo
Biography:

Susanna Mittermaier is a psychologist and author of the #1 international bestselling books, Pragmatic Psychology: Practical Tools for Being Crazy Happy. As a global speaker, Susanna offers a new paradigm on psychology and therapy called Pragmatic Psychology.

Susanna is known for her revolutionary perspective on facilitating change. Her pragmatic approach invites people to choose what works and that which create the greatest outcome in business, leadership and their lives. Susanna Mittermaier inspires people all over the world to unveil their brilliance and guides others to see problems and difficulties instead of possibilities and potent choices.

Susanna Mittermaier, a pragmatic psychologist, from Vienna, Austria, educated in Sweden at the university clinic of Lund, where she was mentoring the hospital staff, conducted neuropsychological testing and psychotherapy with patients and developed a new approach to psychology. She is the author of the Best Seller, Pragmatic Psychology and a worldwide speaker.

Abstract:

Psychology used to be the study of knowledge, the study of how people function and the value of it and the curiosity and exploration of possibilities. Nowadays psychology is the study of behavior and about the categorization of what is sane and what is insane.

What if psychology could be a place of possibility and the beginning of sanity rather than an exile for those who do not fit?

Where do we start?

By being realistic, realistic means the ability to see things as they are and dealing with them in a pragmatic way.

Seeing what it requires asking questions.

What are the things we call problems and disabilities? Are they disabilities or maybe even abilities? What abilities are hiding behind disabilities? Asking questions is pragmatic.

“Pragmatic” means doing what works. What works is asking for the possibilities in the seemingly impossible.

The target with Pragmatic Psychology is to empower clients to access their abilities rather than focusing on their problems. Pragmatic Psychology is about what can be created when life is no longer about controlling behavior. Every problem becomes a possibility to change your life. How? Questions and tools to empower the client to know what they know and to discover the abilities behind the limitations

Questions empower the client to look for new ways out of their situation; an answer only confirms the rightness of the limitation. Pragmatic Psychology empowers the client to create their own pragmatic way beyond the problem.

Results: ADHD patients being able to use their hyperactivity as a resource to create their lives. Depression and anxiety being discovered as extreme awareness that no longer, being overwhelming and having to be defended against, can be used as a source of creation.  Patients coming for anger management discovering their potency that was covered by their label. PTSD ceasing to haunt clients and the potency slumbering all those years behind the victimizing story being accessed. Autism being acknowledged as a highly interactive and communicative group of people.

Problems and diagnoses being possibilities and abilities rather than limitations. What if having to have problems was no longer the paradigm to live by in our society? What if our past no longer determines our future but can be created and chosen as desired in every moment? Time to create a different point of view on all standard diagnoses and to focus on abilities and diversity? Time to have psychology is the gift it can?

Keynote Forum

Salema Veliu

University of Cambridge, England

Keynote: The effects of technology on society, mind, behaviour, and well-being

Time : 9:40 A.M to 10:20 A.M

Conference Series CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY 2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Salema Veliu  photo
Biography:

Salema returned to the University of Cambridge as a mature student after 15 years of teaching Yoga, Yoga Therapy, Philosophy and Meditation around the world. She has graduated twice with an Undergraduate Diploma in Coaching (Psychology) and an undergraduate Certificate in Experimental Cognitive Psychology. Also completing additional studies in Molecular and Behavioural Mechanisms of Stress and the Science of Mindfulness. In addition, she has also undertaken studies with the University of Birmingham (a Foundation in Neurobiology), University College London ( in Dementia), and a 6-month study period at the University of London/Birkbeck in Biopsychology, Evolutionary and Social Psychology, Research methods, AI + Robotics. She is a member of the Coaching Alumni at Cambridge. She has coached on the Queens Leaders Programme and regular guest lectures on the Undergraduate Programme for Coaching at the Institute of Continuing Education, Cambridge. She is a student affiliate member of the American Psychological Association and a member of the Association for Contextual Behavioural Science. Her work has been featured in various blogs and publications including Psychologies Magazine and Women’s Health and Fitness and has been featured on BBC Radio as well guest hosting a monthly health and fitness show on a local London radio station.

Abstract:

The relationship between automation and human work, as well as the impact of Technology on Mental Health and Well-Being, is a longstanding area of concern and for reflection, and raises questions around public policy raising complex questions that have technical, social and ethical implications. This presentation will touch some of these thought-provoking areas, in particular how technology is impacting lifestyle choices and health and how this will impact the future deliveries of mental health services and research. Salema has a rich and diverse background of working with Human behaviour from a Holistic as well as Scientific and Academic background. Coaching and mentoring others around transition and change socially and economically within Corporate and Academic sectors. She uses innovative thinking and research from the fields of Data, Machine Learning, AI, Neuroscience, Human Psychology to provide deeper insights into understanding disconnection and how by using alternative approaches instead to find a healthy balance between Humanity and Technology. Creating strategies that move with the times in Human Connection & Performance. Alongside addressing the impact of growing technology on Mental Health and Well-Being from a societal and economic perspective. By using futuristic trends as different markers to address and build mental + physical awareness, resilience and looking at early markers in behaviour that can be used to raise awareness to potential mental health issues that may arise as a result. She continues to present her vision in what she believes is essential for cultivating more awareness and responsibly around Digital regulation, distraction and resilience promoting Psychological flexibility and adaptability both personally and professionally to achieve a beneficial work-life balance. Grounded in academic and real-world learning her presentations provide the foundation for the next generation of ideas, development, and implementation to achieve and healthy balance between Humanity and Technology. 

Keynote Forum

Zeno Geradts

Forensic Institute of the Ministry of Security and Justice, Netherlands

Keynote: Artificial Intelligence, deep learning in forensic science

Time : 10:20 A.M - 11:00 A.M

Conference Series CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY 2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Zeno Geradts photo
Biography:

Zeno Geradts is a senior forensic scientist at the Netherlands Forensic Institute of the Ministry of Security and Justice at the Forensic Digital Biometrics Traces department. He is an expert witness in the area of forensic (video) image processing and biometrics (facial comparison and biometrics such as hands, feet, and clothes). Within the team Forensic Big Data Analysis, he works in research on deep learning and images and video is also working within the European Project ASGARD on Forensic big data analysis. He is nominated as President-Elect at the American Academy of Forensic Science in 2018. He is also chairman of the ENFSI Forensic IT working group. From September 1st, 2014, he is the professor on Forensic Data Science by special appointment at the University of Amsterdam for 1 day a week.

Prof. Dr. Zeno Geradts works since 1991 at the Netherlands Forensic Institute as a forensic scientist. Since 1997 he works at the digital evidence department. In 2002 he received a Ph.D. from the University of Utrecht based on research on computational comparing of forensic images. At the AAFS (American Academy of Forensic Sciences) he has been chairman of the Engineering Section and since 2008-2010 chairman of the section Digital Evidence and Multimedia, he was elected by the section as a member of the Board of Directors of the AAFS from 2010-2013. He is elected as Vice President of the AAFS 2015-2016 and 2015-2016 as Treasurer. He is chairman of the ENFSI Forensic IT working group. He published many papers in forensic journals and contributions to books and is active on casework as expert witness and projects in digital evidence.  

Abstract:

The development of deep learning algorithms has made very good progress in the last years. We see from the last vendor's tests of facial comparison that systems also for non-frontal images are much better and can be used for large databases. Also in other fields of concept detection in images and video, there has been good progress. The methods of deep learning are also applied to author recognition, speaker comparison and many more. The combination of expert and machine is expected to reduce the working load and solve more cases. Of course, one has to validate the results and quality assurance is most important. A short overview is given of pitfalls and solutions within this field.

 

Keynote Forum

Adrienne C Davis

Board Certified in Forensic Psychology Private Practice, USA

Keynote: The continuing challenges of evaluating Juvenile competency to stand trial

Time : 11:00 A.M - 11: 40 A.M

Conference Series CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY 2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Adrienne C Davis photo
Biography:

Dr. Adrienne Davis is a licensed clinical psychologist who specializes in forensic psychology. She holds a BA in psychology from the University of California, Los Angeles and a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Southern California. As an adjunct professor at USC, she taught courses in forensic psychology, mental health law, criminal behavior, and abnormal psychology. Dr. Davis is board certified in forensic psychology by the American Board of Professional Psychology. She has been in practice for 35 years working in forensic hospitals and in private practice evaluating both adult and juvenile offenders to assess their competency, criminal responsibility, and to address rehabilitation, treatment and sentencing matters as well as providing information about the psychological risk factors that underlie delinquent and criminal conduct.  Dr. Davis testifies as an expert witness in criminal, civil, state and federal courts. She is licensed in California and Georgia.

Abstract:

As an increasing number of juveniles are being tried as adults, it has become necessary to extend to them the same due process protections that are afforded adult offenders. In addition, since the types of offenses in which juveniles are involved have become more serious, there is more at stake when judicial decisions are made, particularly with respect to sentencing.  These issues become especially important in determining a juvenile’s competency to stand trial. Historically, efforts have been made to adapt the same competency criteria and/or guidelines, and assessment tools used in evaluating adult offenders to juvenile cases. However, research indicates that unlike adults, there are factors related to a juvenile’s age, developmental stage and maturity that present challenges in determining their competency. This presentation will discuss the evolution of juvenile competency to stand trial, the differences between evaluating adults and juveniles, how these differences are addressed, and the continuing issues that make doing these evaluations a unique challenge for practitioners involved in the juvenile forensic arena. 

Keynote Forum

Jeremy Cassius

Walden University, USA

Keynote: An overview of forensic mental health assessments for American immigration law

Time : 11:40 A.M - 12: 20 P.M

Conference Series CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY 2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jeremy Cassius photo
Biography:

Jeremy has conducted expert assessments, written reports, and testified in many immigration, family, criminal, probate, and employment law matters. A graduate of Kent State University, Jeremy Cassius is a Licensed Professional Counselor with a wealth of experience diagnosing and treating Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), Anxiety, and Depression. From 2009-2013, he served as the Executive Director of PLAN of North Texas Inc, an agency offering lifetime supportive services to clients with severe mental illnesses like Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenia. He is licensed to practice in Texas and New York. Following his position at PLAN, Jeremy began conducting Forensic Mental Assessments for clients of Immigration attorneys, Probate attorneys, Family attorneys, and Personal Injury Attorneys. Jeremy is currently working on his Ph.D. in Forensic Psychology from Walden University. He is conducting his dissertation thesis on the lucid interval and dementia in testamentary capacity proceedings for probate court.

Abstract:

With over 10 million undocumented immigrants in the United States, immigration has become one of the hottest topics in the country.  Every day there is new news about immigration policies, a “wall” being built on the southern border, refugees, and asylum seekers.  This has brought new opportunities to forensic mental health examiners who work with an immigration attorney and immigration courts to provide objective analysis of family situations, trauma, credible fears of asylum seekers avoiding torture and persecution, and many other issues.  This workshop will discuss conducting forensic mental health assessments with undocumented immigrants and the abundance of issues involved

Keynote Forum

Eleonora Papaleontiou – Louca

European University, Cyprus

Keynote: Psychology, religion and mental health

Time : 12:20 P.M - 01:00 P.M

Conference Series CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY 2019 International Conference Keynote Speaker Eleonora Papaleontiou – Louca photo
Biography:

Eleonora Papaleontiou - Louca is an associate professor in Psychology at the European University Cyprus and a Vice-Chairperson at the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences. She has also served twice as a coordinator of the Psychology program at the European University Cyprus. She has received a B.Ed. degree (Cyprus & Greece), an M.A. in Education (University of Reading, U.K.) and a Ph.D. in Developmental / Cognitive and Educational Psychology (Cardiff University, U.K.).

She has published many articles in Greek and international journals and has also published the books: “Children’s and Adolescents’ Mental Health” (in press), “Current Trends in Preschool Curriculum” Tipothito pl/ions, “Metacognition and Theory of Mind”, Cambridge Scholars Publications and “Metacognition: Theory and Practice” Thymari Publications, Greece. Dr. E. Louca has also given hundreds of lectures to parents and specialized groups related to psychological topics and children’s upbringing issues. Her research interests include Mental Health, Metacognition, Theory of Mind, Creative and Critical Thinking, Language Development, Spiritual Development, Emotional Development, Emotional Intelligence and the relationship between Religion and Psychology.

Abstract:

The relationship between Psychology and Religion is not a matter of recent, only, interest, but also part of our tradition. Theology and modern psychology try together to tackle the same subject, the human psychosomatic world. How much do these two disciplines differ or they look like each other?

In this presentation, we would like to examine the similarities and differences between Psychology and Religion/Theology in terms of their purpose and aims, in the means and methods they use, in coping with difficulties and pain, in assisting those in need and in their relationship with Mental Health.

Besides, we examine the relationship between Religion and Mental Health. Is this relationship always positive? If, no, under which circumstances is it positive and under which is it negative?

  • Clinical Psychology | Forensic Psychology | Cognitive Behavioural Therapy | Mental Health | Positive Psychology | Psychological Disorders
Location: Amsterdam
Speaker
Biography:

In my past, I have lived in different countries, including France, Italy, Libya, Argentina, and Monte Carlo. The different experiences and cultures have shaped me as an individual and have given me a broader perspective on life and on the challenges that everyone can face in his/ her life. I also learned the importance of “cultural context”. As a psychologist, I have an eclectic approach: I offer evidence-based psychological therapy and counseling, using different techniques or methodologies, always tailored to suit the individual and its needs. I use Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), Schema Therapy (ST), Voice Dialogue (VD) and, in case of trauma treatment, Eye Movement Desensitization, and Reprocessing (EMDR). I speak fluently Dutch, English, Spanish and Italian, and work with expats as well as with locals.

Abstract:

After shortly introducing Schema Therapy, elucidating its origins and pillars, we will talk about Schema’s (what is a Schema and how does originate) and Modes (how an individual “copes” with an activated Schema and its consequences on patient’s behavior).

Further, we will look at a Clinical Case and will use it to elucidate how Schema Therapy principles have been applied to help the Patient solve its problems. This will be done by using a Case Conceptualization, illustrating how this can be seen as a key element for successful treatment. We will also look at how the therapist’s personal schema’s and modes can be activated during treatment, how to become aware of it and correct it for more effective collaboration.

We will describe Patient’s life problems, looking at early childhood origins, core unmet needs, specific schema’s and modes, trigger events with an example, observations and problems during therapy and how these have been challenged and solved.

Michiel Hobbelt

Social Psychologist, The Netherlands

Title: Sustainable happiness
Speaker
Biography:

Michiel Hobbelt is a master social psychologist and a happiness expert. After his studies, he worked for a number of years for happiness professor Ruut Veenhoven at Erasmus University. He is the founder of the Gelukcentrale and he is committed to promoting the happiness of people now and in the future at companies, organizations, and municipalities.

Abstract:

We are living in one of the most prosperous countries in the world. But there is a problem: The ecological footprint of the Netherlands is about three and a half times what the earth can produce. Further growth in prosperity has less and less influence on our happiness (Veenhoven, 2018), while this growth has an ever increasing impact on our planet (Living Planet Report, 2018). Why then do we continue to focus on more prosperity and do we not consciously choose for more happiness? Can you live more sustainable and be happy? In order to become sustainable, we need a behavioral change in addition to technical progress. Research shows that people anticipate to sustainable technology, such that the environmental benefits are often largely negated (rebound effect). Various studies show that it is possible to live with a lower ecological footprint and be happy, both at the country level and at an individual level. A sustainable and happy life is a dynamic life with friends and family, personal development, contributing to society, living with attention and movement. Research shows that happy people are more co-operative, more open to change and more creative. These qualities that happy people have in common are of great importance for the transition to a sustainable society. It is therefore of great importance to focus on happiness in order to get a sustainable society.

Speaker
Biography:

Arooj Najmussaqib has completed her MS (Clinical Psychology) in 2011 from Government College University, Lahore. She has been practicing as a Clinical Psychologist since 2014 in Islamabad. Currently, she is serving as a regular faculty member at the Department of Applied Psychology teaching at the undergraduate and postgraduate level since 2016. She is an author of a book and published and presented papers in National and International Conference

Abstract:

The phenomenon of study anxiety travels across geographic and cultural boundaries. Study anxiety is being affected by both emotional and cognitive factors. Though there has been an increasing amount of research conducted on study anxiety in adolescence, little is known about the relation of study anxiety, academic achievement and parent child relation among school children. The present study was aimed at exploring the relation between study anxiety, academic achievement and parent-child relation of school children. For this purpose, an indigenous tool Study Anxiety Scale, Vocabulary and Reading Comprehension Scales of GCU battery and Parent-Child Relationship Scale was administered on the sample of 419 school children; 201 boys; and 218 girls from 6 Government Schools of Lahore, Pakistan. The results suggest that perceived rejection and distant in parent-child relation cause higher study anxiety and lower academic achievement among school children. Results also depicted that the girls are higher in both study anxiety and academic achievement than boys and boys perceived more parental rejection than girls. Results are discussed in a cultural context proposing a model showing possible links between different environmental influences and study anxiety. 

Speaker
Biography:

I have just completed my Masters in Clinical Psychology at the age of 36 yrs at the University of Nairobi and I am presenting my Ph.D. proposal concept this month. Hopefully, I shall be admitted for the same next month as I wait for graduation on the 21st of December. I intend to publish this study and another one that I did on the safety of mental patients at Kenyatta National Hospital. I have been working as a counselor and research consultant

Abstract:

Mental health and HIV/AIDS have been closely interlinked; this is with regards to the attribution of mental disorders to the increase in the prevalence of HIV infections and HIV infections being associated with the increase in the prevalence of mental disorders. Some of the neurological or mental disorders that are commonly linked to HIV/AIDS globally are depression and anxiety and their comorbidity. This comorbidity which is more prevalent among women can consequently impact the relationship between a mother and her child especially with regards to the social-emotional development of the child which is linked to general well being and adaptive adjustment in adulthood. Unfortunately, studies looking into the impact of this comorbidity, particularly, in HIV- infected mothers, on children’s socio-emotional development are scarce. Hence this study assessed the prevalence of comorbid depression and anxiety disorder in HIV- positive mothers and its implication on the child’s socio-emotional development.

The study design was cross-sectional. HIV positive mothers with children between the age of 24 and 36 months were the targeted study population. Systematic random sampling was used to get 185 respondents.

A researcher-designed socio-demographic questionnaire, the BDI, BAI were used to assess for depression and anxiety in mothers while and the Brief Infant and Toddler Social Emotional Assessment were used to identifying the children with emotional and social difficulties. Data analysis was done using SPSS version 23. 

The study found that the prevalence of Comorbid depression and anxiety among HIV -positive mothers was 38.4%. The prevalence of socio-emotional development problems among children was also 38.9%. There was no association between comorbid depression and anxiety in mothers and child’s emotional development problems at a p=0.672. However, there was a negative linear relationship between the competence deficit component of socio-emotional development and BDI scores (depression) { r = -.154, p =. 0.037}. Meaning that as the severity of depression increased, the child was more likely to have competence delays or deficits.

Speaker
Biography:

DOSUMU Andrew Tunade is a PhD clinical psychology student of Redeemer's University Ede, Nigeria. He is the Director of PsychCare Humaniterex Foundation (Centre for Rehabilitation and Health Promotion) in Ile-ife, Nigeria. He is a member of Nigerian Psychological Association (NPA). He has written and presented papers in conferences with publications. 

Abstract:

 

In Nigeria, there is no reliable data for persons with mental illness but an estimated figure of, 40 million Nigerians suffer from one mental illness to the other. The traditional, cultural and religious beliefs of Nigerians present stigma for persons with mental illness. This stigmatization, however, distorts efforts for the rehabilitation of persons with mental illness. The society attaches a serious stigma to mental illness and once a person is diagnosed with mental illness he is isolated. This isolation has made persons with mental illness roam the streets as vagrants, while the unlucky ones are killed by reckless drivers on the highways others are killed by ritualists. There is an attribution bias among Africans that once a person developed mental illness he never gets completely cured of it regardless of the treatment and rehabilitation efforts.  Such stigmatization emphasizes spiritual factor as the cause of mental illness and this could be reasons that make Africans seek healing from religious and traditional outlets while conventional rehabilitation efforts suffer set back. This study sets out to assess African's perception of mental illness and how stigmatization poses threat to rehabilitation using the stigma scale and the mental illness perception scale. 

Sam Vaknin

Southern Federal University, Russia

Title: The Insanity of the insanity defense
Speaker
Biography:

Sam Vaknin is the author of "Malignant Self-love: Narcissism Revisited" and other books about personality disorders. His work is cited in hundreds of books and dozens of academic papers
He spent the past 6 years developing a treatment modality for Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD). Over the years, with volunteers, it was found to be effective with clients suffering from a major depressive episode as well.

 

Abstract:

If mental illness is culture-dependent and mostly serves as an organizing social principle - what should we make of the insanity defense (NGRI- Not Guilty by Reason of Insanity)?

A person is held not responsible for his criminal actions if s/he cannot tell right from wrong ("lacks substantial capacity either to appreciate the criminality (wrongfulness) of his conduct" - diminished capacity), did not intend to act the way he did (absent "mens rea") and/or could not control his behavior ("irresistible impulse"). These handicaps are often associated with "mental disease or defect" or "mental retardation".

Mental health professionals prefer to talk about an impairment of a "person's perception or understanding of reality". They hold a "guilty but mentally ill" verdict to be contradiction in terms. All "mentally-ill" people operate within a (usually coherent) worldview, with consistent internal logic, and rules of right and wrong (ethics). Yet, these rarely conform to the way most people perceive the world. The mentally-ill, therefore, cannot be guilty because s/he has a tenuous grasp on reality.

Yet, experience teaches us that a criminal maybe mentally ill even as s/he maintains a perfect reality test and thus is held criminally responsible (Jeffrey Dahmer comes to mind). The "perception and understanding of reality", in other words, can and does co-exist even with the severest forms of mental illness.

This makes it even more difficult to comprehend what is meant by "mental disease". If some mentally ill maintain a grasp on reality, know right from wrong, can anticipate the outcomes of their actions, are not subject to irresistible impulses (the official position of the American Psychiatric Association) - in what way do they differ from us, "normal" folks?

This is why the insanity defense often sits ill with mental health pathologies deemed socially "acceptable" and "normal" - such as religion or love.

Speaker
Biography:

María Ortuño Soria is a Clinical Psychologist with a Minor in Sexology. At the moment is completing the Doctoral Program in Psychology at the Faculdade de Psicologia e de Ciências da Educação of Universidade de Porto, Portugal; her specialized training in epidemiological research design skills, data linkage, analysis and writing is accompanied and supported by her participation in a research project at the School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine of the University of Monash, Victoria, Australia.

Abstract:

The increase of collective disasters, natural or provoked, in the last years, has remarked the impact and relevance of traumatic events in the personal, family, economic and labor areas; with it has been given the increase of the clinical diagnosis of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). The personal care required by the primary victim demands a direct contact with the signs and symptoms of this disorder, especially by the significant other, being the most vulnerable to develop a Secondary Traumatic Stress Disorder.

Secondary PostTraumatic Stress Disorder has progressively intensified its importance within health problems as political and social. Clinically it is characterized by presenting symptoms of PTSD emphasizing generalized stress, functional and somatic problems (Lahav, Stein, & Solomon, 2016). Emotionally it has been seen that conjugal relationships present a risk in their close, natural, intimate bond of love, confidentiality, and reproduction.

In the present review, the main objective was to identify articles on secondary stress disorder focusing on the second victim as the main figure. The results of this systematic review allow us to have a better understanding of the nature, prevalence, and research conducted on secondary stress in the significant person, however, It also allows us to see that there is little research on the subject, which is why a greater compilation of data is required in order to be able to give a significant support in the prevention, intervention and control schemes.

Speaker
Biography:

Colonel James L. Greenstone, Ed.D, JD, DABECI, has been in practice for over fifty years and has worked for over forty years in law enforcement. He was a police hostage negotiator and trainer and served as Director of Psychological Services for the Fort Worth, Texas, Police Department. Additionally, he was the operational police behavioral health specialist for the Hostage and Crisis Negotiation Team. At the Tarrant County Precinct Four Constable’s Office, Dr. Greenstone was a Deputy Constable and Director of Behavioral Health Services. Currently, he is a Deputy Sheriff for the Tarrant County Sheriff’s Office and Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Police Emergency Response. He is a Diplomate of the Society for Police and Criminal Psychology and a Professor in the College of Osteopathic Medicine at NOVA Southeastern University. He is a Life Fellow of the American Board for Certification of Clinical Education and Training. Greenstone’s other published works include The Elements of Police Hostage and Crisis Negotiations: Critical Incidents and How to Respond to Them, The Elements of Disaster Psychology: Managing Psychosocial Trauma, and Emotional First Aid: Field Guide to Crisis Intervention and Psychological Survival. His latest book, On Policing: From Swords into Plowshares was released recently

Abstract:

Crisis is in the eye of the beholder. Crisis involves stress; unusual stress that renders the sufferer unable to cope with their life as they usually would. A disaster exists when the resources available to address the emergency are less than those needed to address the needs of the victims and the overall situation. A disaster can be of any size. The issue is whether or not the needs of those affected by the disaster can be met with the resources available at that time. Overwhelmed resources usually equals disaster as differentiated from an emergency in which adequate resources can be utilized to resolve or to manage the needs of those affected. Here, we are about crisis and about the possibility of overwhelmed resources both personal and public. The greater and more personal the perceived threat, the greater the likelihood for crisis to occur. 

Lisa J Warren

Monash University, Australia

Title: Stalkers and persistent offenders
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Warren is a pioneer of the behavioural threat management field in Australia. She was the Foundation Manager of the Problem Behaviour Program at the Victorian Institute of Forensic Mental Health (Forensicare) where she supported the development of treatment programs for violent offenders, sexual offenders, stalkers, threateners and vexatious complainants. She was the Foundation President of the Asia Pacific Association of Threat Assessment Professionals (APATAP) and a Senior Editor for the Journal of Threat Assessment and Management. Her research has focused on clinical and risk evaluation of those who threaten to kill themselves and others.

 

Abstract:

Dr. Warren is a pioneer of the behavioural threat management field in Australia. She was the Foundation Manager of the Problem Behaviour Program at the Victorian Institute of Forensic Mental Health (Forensicare) where she supported the development of treatment programs for violent offenders, sexual offenders, stalkers, threateners, and vexatious complainants. She was the Foundation President of the Asia Pacific Association of Threat Assessment Professionals (APATAP) and a Senior Editor for the Journal of Threat Assessment and Management. Her research has focused on clinical and risk evaluation of those who threaten to kill themselves and others.